Randomness in my Head

theweekmagazine:

These real-life Rosie the Riveters changed the face of labor

Vintage photos from the library of congress capture a time when the country ran on womanpower

(via smartgirlsattheparty)

macteenbooks:

TRIAL BY FIRE goes on sale today! Check out the book trailer here! 

stairwaytocastiel:

me during the last 9 seasons: i really love how dean protects sam at all costs, it’s my favourite brotherly thing about the show.

spn writers:

image

(via supernaturalapocalypse)

bobbycaputo:

Here’s Why We Need to Protect Public Libraries

We live in a “diverse and often fractious country,” writes Robert Dawson, but there are some things that unite us—among them, our love of libraries. “A locally governed and tax-supported system that dispenses knowledge and information for everyone throughout the country at no cost to its patrons is an astonishing thing,” the photographer writes in the introduction to his book, The Public Library: A Photographic Essay. “It is a shared commons of our ambitions, our dreams, our memories, our culture, and ourselves.”

But what do these places look like? Over the course of 18 years, Dawson found out. Inspired by “the long history of photographic survey projects,” he traveled thousands of miles and photographed hundreds of public libraries in nearly all 50 states. Looking at the photos, the conclusion is unavoidable: American libraries are as diverse as Americans. They’re large and small, old and new, urban and rural, and in poor and wealthy communities. Architecturally, they represent a range of styles, from the grand main branch of the New York Public Library to the humble trailer that serves as a library in Death Valley National Park, the hottest place on Earth. “Because they’re all locally funded, libraries reflect the communities they’re in,” Dawson said in an interview. “The diversity reflects who we are as a people.”

(Continue Reading)

(via sarahthompson84)

lu-fu-maybe:

Try to avoid describing poc characters like “They’re skin was olive/milk chocolate etc”. Write “Their skin was black.” Write it so clearly, in bold and italics, maybe put some stars around it too, repeat it every now and then. That way, when your book gets made into a film, no one will get confused and think that when you said “milk chocolate” you actually meant “so hella white with a bit of a tan”

And then maybe we won’t get a Katniss that’s pale, and people protesting that Rue was the color she was supposed to be, and….

There’s just too many…

(via bookoisseur)

This reality is a bit harder to swallow: There are more white people in the US and Canada because the US and Canada were established using the systematic genocide of Native peoples, the theft of Native lands, and the labour of enslaved peoples in the past and immigrant peoples currently who were and are never meant to stay or survive.

And now you’re uncomfortable. Good.

When you accept and acknowledge that census figures reflect a long history of marginalization, it is preposterous to use these same figures as the benchmark to which you measure the inclusion of marginalized people.

— There’s a great piece in the Toast about representation and diversity (‘Proportional Representation’ Has No Place In Diversity Discussions by Léonicka Valcius) today. (via whineandbeer)

(via bookoisseur)

Reviewing Dangerous Creatures over on A Geek in Librarian’s Clothing today…  Let’s just say I’m not sure I can handle another cliffhanger book with my fav characters.. 

Reviewing Dangerous Creatures over on A Geek in Librarian’s Clothing today…  Let’s just say I’m not sure I can handle another cliffhanger book with my fav characters..